Welcome to www.worthingpubs.com, dedicated to researching the history of our local pubs.

This study is ongoing and we welcome contributions, stories, pictures etc that will expand our knowledge and bring back memories of times past.
Feel free to email us HERE

GREEN MAN - SOUTH STREET, WEST WORTHING
 

 

 

Welcome to Worthing's newest Micro-pub.  Les Johnson, owner, licensee, bar keep and the man behind the project opens the doors on the 7th of October 2016 at 5pm.

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 
   
HOW IT STARTED
   

Spotted in early June 2016, this poster appeared in what used to be Terra Mia Cafe, a coffee and  sandwich shop which had been empty for some time.

Initial thoughts were that the premises would to far too small for a new micro-pub, however on closer examination and a tour offered by Les Johnson, it became apparent that with the removal of a partial partition wall, the internal area was expanded by at least a third. Expectations are in the region of 25 guests.

   

Part of the reclaimed space is destined to become the stillage room to hold the barrel stock as seen by the structure on the right of this picture. An observation window will be installed. We assume it will be temperature controlled of course.

The set up is not dissimilar from the Brooksteed in South Farm Road although Les is keen not to imitate but  rather try and develop its own character.

Note: Les Johnson is shown here in the blue overalls, happy to get his hands dirty.

   

   

Above, Three steps to heaven, which in this case will lead to the unisex toilet and washing room. Another urinal is planned further back in the building. We are glad to see that this stained glass window is being retained from the original Victorian building.

   

Work in progress. As of yet we have no firm date as to when the new Micro-pub will open but Les is looking at the tail end of August.

   
HISTORY
   

This is the earliest picture we could find of the building. It is the last building in Gordon Terrance and was known as Gordon House in 1914. The owner at that time was James Collins, Baker.

We date this picture to around that period.

   
What's in a name

As odd a name as it may sound for a pub, it's actually a traditional one. The face is depicted as being constructed of leaves, vines, entwine twigs and branches. Often used, but hardly noticed, it can be found on many county churches and symbolises rebirth.